Voters

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Find answers and information about what you need to know as a voter, including the three basic steps to voting.

Voter Resources

2018 Voter Guide (PDF) - will be updated for 2020

Voting in the 2018 General Election-One Page Quick Reference (PDF) - will be updated for 2020

Registering When You Vote-One Page Quick Guide (PDF)

Three Steps to Voting 

Get Registered

Voting Eligibility

You are eligible to register and vote in Minnesota if you:

  • are a United States citizen.
  • will be at least 18 years old on Election Day.
  • will have lived in Minnesota for 20 days immediately before Election Day.
  • live at the address given on your registration form.
  • are not under court-ordered guardianship in which the court order revokes your right to vote.
  • have not been found by a court to be legally incompetent to vote.
  • have any felony conviction record discharged, expired, or you have completed your sentence.*

*Potential voters with a question on the status of a prior felony conviction should contact their probation office to gain clarification and resolve any status questions before completing a voter registration application on line or on paper.

Giving false information on a voter registration application is a felony punishable by not more than five years' imprisonment or a fine of not more than $10,000, or both.

Check Your Registration and Register Online

Check your registration to see if you're registered at your current address. 

If you've never registered, or if you've moved or it's been more than four years since you last voted, you can get registered now.

Online registration is fast and easy. You need either your Minnesota Driver's License or ID card number, or the last four digits of your social security number in order to complete your registration online. 

Other Registration Options 

You can also register by completing and submitting a paper voter registration application. Registration forms are available in multiple languages, as well as in large print and via other accessible options.

Pre-registration closes 20 days before each election. If you haven't pre-registered, you can register when you vote, either at your polling place on Election Day or when voting early. You need to provide an accepted proof of residence when registering when you vote.

Learn more about how to register when you vote or download a one-page quick reference guide of what you need to register when voting. 

Learn more about What's on the Ballot and How to Vote

Know what's on the ballot in 2019

There are no regularly scheduled City elections in 2019.

There are special elections occurring on Nov. 5, 2019. For most voters in the City of Rochester, this includes a special election being conducted by Rochester Public Schools on a bond referendum. Contact Rochester Public Schools for more information on how to vote in the 2019 Bond Referendum.

Know what's on the ballot in 2020

Federal Offices:

Each of these offices will appear on the Nov. 3 General Election ballot. The President & Vice Presidential candidates for each major party will be voted on in the March 3 Presidential Primary, while candidates for senator or representative will appear on the Aug. 11 Partisan Primary Ballot if more than 2 candidates file for a single major party. 

President & Vice President
United States Senator
United States Representative

State Legislative Offices

Each of these offices will appear on the Nov. 3 General Election ballot, and will appear on the Aug. 11 Partisan Primary if more than 2 candidates file for a seat for a single major party.

State Senators from each district in Minnesota
State Representatives from each district in Minnesota 

Judicial Offices

Each of these offices will appear on the Nov. 3 General Election ballot, and will appear on the Aug. 11 Non-Partisan Primary if more than 2 candidates file for a seat. 

Supreme Court Associate Justice (2 Seats)
Court of Appeals (6 seats)
Third District Court Judges

County Offices

Each of these offices will appear on the Nov. 3 General Election ballot, and will appear on the Aug. 11 Non-Partisan Primary if more than 2 candidates file for a seat.  

County Commissioner (4 seats - Districts 1, 3, 5 and 7)
Soil and Water Conservation Officers

City Offices

Each of these offices will appear on the Nov. 3 General Election ballot, and will appear on the Aug. 11 Non-Partisan Primary if more than 2 candidates file for a seat.  

Council President
Council Members (3 seats - Wards 2, 4 and 6)

School Board

Each of these offices will appear on the Nov. 3 General Election ballot, and will appear on the Aug. 11 Non-Partisan Primary if more than 2 candidates file for a seat.  

Board Members (Seats 2, 4, 5 and 6)

Know what to expect when voting

Before you go vote, early or on Election Day, download your sample ballot to see exactly what your actual ballot will look like, including which races are on your ballot and how it is arranged. 

Learn more about candidates

Candidates for City offices (Mayor and City Council) submit filing affidavits to the City Clerk's Office. Those affidavits for past years are available on this website, as are any campaign finance reports filed by City candidates or their campaigns.

Other resources to learn more about candidates for all offices include the online sample ballot look up which includes links to candidate information when available, local media, and candidate forums.

The City Clerk's Office will again partner with the League of Women Voters and other area entities to host candidate forums for several local offices on the ballot in 2020.

Go vote

Make a voting plan

Decide when and how you will vote before Election Day arrives.

You have three choices to cast your ballot for the General Election:

  1. By mail, beginning 46 days before each election
  2. Early in-person, beginning 46 days before each election at the designated location in Olmsted County and beginning in 2020 at additional designated locations 7 days before each election
  3. On Election Day at your assigned polling place.

Think about which option will work best for you and make a plan to vote now. This will ensure you have plenty of time to request a mail ballot, or to make any necessary arrangements to get to the Early Voting location or your polling place at a time that will work for you.